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Graphic Examples provides services in commercial and forensic art to agencies and the public. While Graphic Examples is specializes in forensic art, portraits literary illustration as well as image preparation and graphic design for print or Internet are also available.

 

 
 
Forensic art plays in important role in the justice system and the community by helping to discover information necessary to solve a mystery. Forensic art encompasses several disciplines including: composite drawing, two or three dimensional reconstruction of a face from the skull, post mortem drawing from crime scene or morgue photos, age progression, exhibits of demonstrative evidence and also the illustrate of courtroom proceedings where camera photographs are not permitted. While DNA has become a tool of choice in identification, it can only be helpful when there is an existing sample to match it with. Forensic art can help to spark the recognition that will make gathering definitive evidence possible.
         
 
Composite drawing is made from a witness description used to assist in the identification of another person or alleged perpetrator. While each artist’s method may vary in the use of reference photographs, a cognitive interview process based on best practices is used to call forth the primary information. Recent Research has contributed much to standards in procedure. See information in Links and on the Composite Portfolio pages.
         
 
Post Mortem drawing. A drawing of the deceased made from crime scene or morgue photographs with knowledge of how injury, time and environment affect human tissue. This is most useful when there is at least a good portion of the face is preserved, but damage to parts of the face makes the actual photograph unsuitable for viewing by public or family members. The resulting face will resemble the way the person most likely looked in life using cues on hair style and other details from evidence.
         
 
Two dimensional facial reconstruction is a drawing overlay made over a photograph of a skull with tissue markers based on anthropological data of race, sex, age, build and any other found evidence. The finished portrait is intended to be a reasonable likeness of the deceased person that may be used to help used to help discover the person’s identity. The advantage of this technique is that it usually requires less time and material than a complete three dimensional sculpture. The actual skull however does need to have tissue markers applied by a trained professional and photographed without distortion. Most forensic artists insist on having the actual skull to work on directly to preserve the integrity of their work. The results can easily be faxed or emailed anywhere with the original work to follow as evidence.
         
  Three dimensional facial reconstruction – a sculpture based on the actual or replicated skull of a person using anthropological data of race, sex, age build and any other found evidence. The finished sculpture is intended to be a reasonable likeness of the deceased person that may be used to help discover their identity or for educational purposes as in museum work. The benefit of this technique is that subtle countenance of the bone is more easily discerned and can be reflected in the features. A lifelike appearance from the use of glass eyes as well as details in texture, hair and other evidence can be included. The finished work can be photographed from multiple angles. providing more references for recognition and comparison to a photographs for determining a possible identity.
         
   

Courtroom Illustration. Sketches, often with a caricature quality are used to illustrate courtroom events. The quality of the sketch allows the drama and character of the participants to be conveyed, often better than a photograph and without the intrusiveness or jeopardy of the exact identification of witnesses or jurors.

         
    Age Progression is used to take the image of a known person and advance it based on the person’s facial attributes combined with facial attributes of family members at or near the target age. This is useful in finding missing children and fugitives after a period of time has passed from the date of the last photograph. While age progression can be done by hand or using computer technology, having at least one photograph of the person being sought and at least one of a close family member at the target age are considered minimal requirements.
         
    Demonstrative Evidence. Demonstrative evidence can be any exhibit, model, scenario or replication that is used to demonstrate some aspect of the case. This may be two or three dimensional, physical or computer based and typically might include: floor plans, a scale model, a computer simulation or video based on facts in evidence
         
         
         

Copyright 2010 by Julia Szten